Christmas is the time of year when there seems to be a huge expectation on us all to be happy, and despite it being promoted as the most wonderful time of the year, for individuals suffering from depression or other mental health problems, the holiday season can actually be a time of dread.

 

Whether it’s due to financial struggles, worrying about health, concerns over family tensions or being alone over the festive period, the chances are, stress and anxiety levels are likely to be worse at this time of year for all of us, but for those suffering from depression, it’s even harder.

 

Did you know…

  • One in five people will suffer depression at some point in their lives, with the conditions affecting a higher proportion of women than men
  • 350 million people worldwide are struggling with depression
  • Fewer than half those affected get adequate treatment
  • It is estimated that 1 million deaths are caused by depression-related suicide with men being 3 times more likely to die by suicide than women

 

Some symptoms of depression may include:

  • Feeling negative about yourself
  • Feelings of inadequacy
  • Feeling irritable and moody
  • Loss of energy and motivation
  • Feelings of anxiety
  • Persistent sadness or feeling unhappy
  • Thoughts of self-harm
  • Disturbed sleep

 

If you or anyone you know is suffering with depression or anxiety, it’s important to get some coping strategies in place now. Perhaps make arrangement to join friends or family members if you, or they are likely to be alone at Christmas, or make time to visit a friends for a catch up if you know that you or they are particularly struggling.  If you are hosting Christmas this year, why not ask for some help?  Someone else taking on a few additional jobs will relieve some of the pressure.  It will go along way to helping everyone feel loved and supported over the festive season.