A newspaper article that struck a chord with me recently was The Guardian’s It’s good to talk: China opens up to psychotherapy.  Whilst I was reading the article I realised that as a psychotherapist how fortunate I’ve been to have had access to such high standards of psychotherapy training and re-training with newer therapies such as EMDR throughout the years in my chosen profession.  And I’ve been fortunate to experience life here and abroad.  These two combined factors mean that I am able to support and empathise with clients during counselling sessions.

I realised how fortunate we are in the UK to have talking therapy answers to the issues raised in the article such as identity, relationships and anxiety.  Also, answers that address specific issues at a deeper level such as loneliness, isolation, self-esteem, conflict and trauma.  However, I found myself realising that even with our advanced access to therapy there are lifestyle similarities with China.

In the UK we have relationship and communication issues in families where family members are unable to express their feelings, which is in turn passed on to the next generation causing internal conflict, emotional distress and anxiety.  In the multi-cultural UK, I also see clients who have cultural traditions to uphold publically, but privately they want change to live their lives.

Our technology advancement such as instant chat facilities and skype has given us the ability to communicate and has given counsellors such as myself greater access to support clients in emergency situations.  However, clients often feel that technology is depressing, a barrier from having positive and close relationships with loved ones, people they want in their lives, or with colleagues.

The article is a fascinating insight to the changes in therapy for China – and I do wonder what would have happened if I’d been born in China!