In January, I was invited onto ITV’s This Morning, to work alongside Dr Dawn Harper on a feature based on female anger issues; where we joined Philip Schofield and Christine Bleakley on the sofa.

Unfortunately, we didn’t have the luxury of time to help as many callers as we would have liked; but one caller we did get the chance to talk with was incredibly overwhelmed with the amount of stresses and strains she had on her plate, and felt desperately out of control and angry.

For people that are feeling enormously under pressure, it is incredibly common for this to snowball out of control and lead onto depression, anxiety and high levels of anger. Before committing to therapy, there are some key steps that an individual can take to minimise the impact this is having on their life.

I will start with just three, as tackling too many is overwhelming in itself.

1) Get to the root causes, and tackle them one by one. Not together.

Try to understand what elements are creating the feeling of overwhelm, stress or anger. It’s common to wrap them all in a bundle and make no progress at all. However, it is likely that there are several different issues, and if tackled in a logical way, in isolation of each other, then headway can be made and clarity can be gained, relieving those nasty symptoms.

2) Keep lists, and tick them off when you have achieved something on that list.

Too much information swimming round in our heads creates a cluttered mind, with little room to process information. Especially when we are carrying the burden of anger outbursts that are often caused by pressure. Lists just make it that much easier, and will help to manage your time and priorities.

3) Spend some time concentrating on your own wellbeing.

Whether a brisk walk, a long bath, or something else you enjoy doing. Try and do this at least twice a week.

There are several therapies we use to tackle this feeling of overwhelm, stress, anxiety, anger and depression, and are always here to help. However these are three steps that can be taken immediately to try and ease some of that pressure.