Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, or CBT, is a relatively quick form of treatment, often requiring only 10 to 15 weekly one hour sessions. The exact number of sessions depends on the person and the problem, as CBT requires active participation by the individual.

Many people are unsure of what CBT does. It is behaviour therapy, meaning that it aims to correct negative or unwanted patterns of behaviour or thought.

Here is a list of the top uses for CBT:

  • stress
  • schizophrenia
  • anorexia
  • bulimia
  • chronic fatigue syndrome
  • anger management
  • insomnia
  • OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder)
  • depression
  • phobias

Many therapists like to combine CBT with other therapies, such as hypnotherapy, which often helps to speed up the process.

How does CBT help?

By taking (what can feel like) insurmountable tasks and teaching you how to apply a pragmatic and objective viewpoint to these issues, CBT gradually changes the way you look at everyday challenges.

With CBT, the therapist acknowledges that there may be behaviours that you cannot control through rational thought. Rather, these harmful coping strategies are as a result of prior conditioning from the environment and other internal or external stimuli.

What can you expect from a session?

A typical one-on-one CBT session starts with discussing what it is you would like to talk about that day. With your therapist’s help, you will dismantle each problem into small, digestible parts that can be easily analysed.

Each session usually lasts from 30 minutes to an hour, and the courses usually consist of around 6 to 12 sessions.